Chapter 19. Network File System (NFS)

Chapter 19. Network File System (NFS)

19.1. How It Works
19.1.1. Required Services
19.2. NFS Client Configuration
19.2.1. Mounting NFS File Systems using /etc/fstab
19.3. autofs
19.3.1. What's new in autofs version 5?
19.3.2. autofs Configuration
19.3.3. autofs Common Tasks
19.4. Common NFS Mount Options
19.5. Starting and Stopping NFS
19.6. NFS Server Configuration
19.6.1. Exporting or Sharing NFS File Systems
19.6.2. Command Line Configuration
19.6.3. Hostname Formats
19.7. The /etc/exports Configuration File
19.7.1. The exportfs Command
19.8. Securing NFS
19.8.1. Host Access
19.8.2. File Permissions
19.9. NFS and portmap
19.9.1. Troubleshooting NFS and portmap
19.10. Using NFS over TCP
19.11. Additional Resources
19.11.1. Installed Documentation
19.11.2. Useful Websites
19.11.3. Related Books

A Network File System (NFS) allows remote hosts to mount file systems over a network and interact with those file systems as though they are mounted locally. This enables system administrators to consolidate resources onto centralized servers on the network.

This chapter focuses on fundamental NFS concepts and supplemental information.


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