19.1. How It Works

19.1. How It Works

Currently, there are three versions of NFS. NFS version 2 (NFSv2) is older and is widely supported. NFS version 3 (NFSv3) has more features, including 64bit file handles, Safe Async writes and more robust error handling. NFS version 4 (NFSv4) works through firewalls and on the Internet, no longer requires portmapper, supports ACLs, and utilizes stateful operations. Red Hat Enterprise Linux supports NFSv2, NFSv3, and NFSv4 clients, and when mounting a file system via NFS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux uses NFSv3 by default, if the server supports it.

All versions of NFS can use Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) running over an IP network, with NFSv4 requiring it. NFSv2 and NFSv3 can use the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) running over an IP network to provide a stateless network connection between the client and server.

When using NFSv2 or NFSv3 with UDP, the stateless UDP connection under normal conditions has less Protocol overhead than TCP which can translate into better performance on very clean, non-congested networks. The NFS server sends the client a file handle after the client is authorized to access the shared volume. This file handle is an opaque object stored on the server's side and is passed along with RPC requests from the client. The NFS server can be restarted without affecting the clients and the cookie remains intact. However, because UDP is stateless, if the server goes down unexpectedly, UDP clients continue to saturate the network with requests for the server. For this reason, TCP is the preferred protocol when connecting to an NFS server.

NFSv4 has no interaction with portmapper, rpc.mountd, rpc.lockd, and rpc.statd, since protocol support has been incorporated into the v4 protocol. NFSv4 listens on the well known TCP port (2049) which eliminates the need for the portmapper interaction. The mounting and locking protocols have been incorpated into the V4 protocol which eliminates the need for interaction with rpc.mountd and rpc.lockd.

Note

TCP is the default transport protocol for NFS under Red Hat Enterprise Linux. UDP can be used for compatibility purposes as needed, but is not recommended for wide usage.

All the RPC/NFS daemon have a '-p' command line option that can set the port, making firewall configuration easier.

After the client is granted access by TCP wrappers, the NFS server refers to its configuration file, /etc/exports, to determine whether the client is allowed to access any of the exported file systems. Once access is granted, all file and directory operations are available to the user.

Important

In order for NFS to work with a default installation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux with a firewall enabled, IPTables with the default TCP port 2049 must be configured. Without proper IPTables configuration, NFS does not function properly.

The NFS initialization script and rpc.nfsd process now allow binding to any specified port during system start up. However, this can be error prone if the port is unavailable or conflicts with another daemon.


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