Chapter 9. The GRUB Boot Loader

Chapter 9. The GRUB Boot Loader

9.1. Boot Loaders and System Architecture
9.2. GRUB
9.2.1. GRUB and the x86 Boot Process
9.2.2. Features of GRUB
9.3. Installing GRUB
9.4. GRUB Terminology
9.4.1. Device Names
9.4.2. File Names and Blocklists
9.4.3. The Root File System and GRUB
9.5. GRUB Interfaces
9.5.1. Interfaces Load Order
9.6. GRUB Commands
9.7. GRUB Menu Configuration File
9.7.1. Configuration File Structure
9.7.2. Configuration File Directives
9.8. Changing Runlevels at Boot Time
9.9. Additional Resources
9.9.1. Installed Documentation
9.9.2. Useful Websites
9.9.3. Related Books

When a computer with Red Hat Enterprise Linux is turned on, the operating system is loaded into memory by a special program called a boot loader. A boot loader usually exists on the system's primary hard drive (or other media device) and has the sole responsibility of loading the Linux kernel with its required files or (in some cases) other operating systems into memory.


Note: This documentation is provided {and copyrighted} by Red Hat®, Inc. and is released via the Open Publication License. The copyright holder has added the further requirement that Distribution of substantively modified versions of this document is prohibited without the explicit permission of the copyright holder. The CentOS project redistributes these original works (in their unmodified form) as a reference for CentOS-5 because CentOS-5 is built from publicly available, open source SRPMS. The documentation is unmodified to be compliant with upstream distribution policy. Neither CentOS-5 nor the CentOS Project are in any way affiliated with or sponsored by Red Hat®, Inc.